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of new york, the city's youngest mayor and the first mayor of color and at the age of 24, just last january, he was sworn in after winning a sweeping a town -- 18 out of 18 districts and winning a four-way mayoral race. before being appointed he was on the city -- the common counsel representing this witty woody's 4th ward. he is a graduate of cornell university where he majored in communications and he was quite active while he was there tutoring underserved students at ithaca and serving as a board member of the racing education attainment challenge organization. immediately to my right is alex morse who is the mayor of holyoke massachusetts. he is also the city's youngest mayor. and he is the second youngest mayor in state history. is that correct? yeah, so he graduated from brown university with a degree in urban studies and during his time at brown he worked as a youth career counselor. he was also on the governors lgbt commission and the main focus of his administration at the moment are early childhood literacy, building an economy focused around art, innovation and technolog
development, the first puerto rican later. we are the first puerto rican city solicitor to speak the language of the people who live in the city. but again, you have to be able to build coalitions. i think that often goes hand-in-hand with transparency. yet the conversation commission, you know, folks, same people have been in this commissions for 20, 30 years. we need to get new people on this commission and often time the charm or come up and they would be reappointed in for the first time in a long time, we would send out a press release. we are looking for new applications and not to my surprise, but other people surprise we get applications for people want to be in our conversation. on the local level, volunteers have a lot of power to make decisions about projects. you have to go through the conservation committee, and those numbers don't get paid anything, but they want to get back to the city. it's not fair to your neighbor who's been wanting to be involved in municipal government in some ways. said to be more transparent, we also couple months ago because he is such a high population
talk about my background how i first got into the position as the mayor in a small city about 40,000 people outside of springfield in the western part of massachusetts. i was born and raised there and went to the public schools and when i got into brown studied urban studies there and unlike a lot of folks my age to give back to the city that i thought had given me the opportunity that i had. holyoke is a rich history and is the first city to the committee to make papers we are the paper city. like a lot of cities on the northeast we move the industrial city but folks came in to holyoke and a lot of the factories moved overseas. the unemployment rate is larger or how your domestic and national average about 50% of the population is latino and mostly puerto rican defense and very diverse city as well. so i got elected last november and there's four of us in the election the nonpartisan from the local level to start against each other in november and i went with 53% of the vote and became the mayor in january at the age of 22 and i turned 23 and i will be 24 in january so i quickly
. she's at at the first city in seattle. i ask you to make sure we do is always at our state and that is to move forward. we move forward on the women's right to choice among going to go backwards. we move forward on respecting marriage equality in our state and i don't believe we should go backwards. we move forward on environmental protection. we should not go backwards. we have not committed us to move forward on health care reforms to begin in tax on all of us and how the system we have people who have insurance industry preventative care. we can move forward on educational reform or do some of the things that have been so successful here in the yakima valley where one in five kids are graduating. we know we can do better and i've got a plan to do that. i ask you to check it out at jay inslee.com. i asked for the honor of your vote. thank you for championing with you. >> moderator: thank you so much for what was the longest two minutes of my life earlier. thank you for your patience in thank you to the audience. that is all the time we have. i want to thank the associatio
trenton, newark and jersey city? >> moderator: senator menendez, europe first. menendez: i'm proud of the areas we work in our state. the reality is that transit villages, the new transportation bill. i'm glad to see that with my leadership on mass transit, new jersey will receive, an additional $70 million more. that legislation is looking at saving and/or creating about 52,000 jobs. a lot of those transit villages and opportunities are right in urban areas, using advantage of our infrastructure. livable communities. my legislation in that regard but hope communities that are not only urban, but the more suburban, but nonetheless very close to urban areas would create greater development opportunity as well. and so, we are going to continue to work with these communities so that in fact they can realize the future of their citizens. >> moderator: senator kyrillos. kyrillos: as i go around the cities of new jersey, i am so sad to see the poverty, to see the unemployment, to see that things haven't gotten better, that our national economy is such that it's even worse in the cities o
of a book cesspool at george mason university was first discussed. the city was one of the initial founders of the festival and is proud to have been a supporter of the vessel ever since. events have been staged in and around the city of fairfax. the local town hall and our historic stage, and the city of fairfax regional library. for the past two years, our brand-new sure what community center. we are proud. we are proud of the "fall for the book festival." it is now my honor to introduce to you our special guest for you. neil gaiman was born in the united kingdom and now lives near minneapolis. he was born and raised in public libraries. he credits laggards of fostering his love of reading. he began his writing career in england as a journalist. his first book was a durand durand biography that took him three months to write. the second was a biography of douglas adams don't panic. the official hitchhikers guide to the galaxy companion. excuse me. this groundbreaking series sandman-- [applause] >> selected a large number of u.s. awards and 75 issue run. >> is at city hall today and one wo
, of course, to the first two -- and then the revival of our cities with detroit as case study number one. we are very proud to be in detroit because we see it as a great city that has incredible potential that we would just love to help participate in that dialogue to help move that process forward a little faster. but what we really want to do is change the dialogue about how the world thinks about technology. because we really don't think it is understood or appreciated how rapidly the entire landscape is shifting because of tech. i mean, today apple's literally announcing the next iphone. that's cool, but that's just the most obvious example of things that continue to move at astonishing speed, and there's developments literally everywhere you look. and we don't think leaders generally get that. so i'm going to give you a couple of little, quick housekeeping things that we need to know. for one thing, there is an app, te space detroit, so look that up and download it, it has all the program. it'll be in realtime all day, please use the app, detroit labs made it, it's very good. te detroit
is from jane and calabasas, california. i'm sorry, first jane in new york city. >> that afternoon. i appreciate you. you raised the question of of only one woman being in the book. you did not answer that question and i would like to revisit it. my concern is that there is only one woman. there are several women inventors. why out of all african american inventors fair, white is there only one -- why is there only one -- and all only one -- and all the ones we did during black history month, okay, joy, thanks. >> the ones that we were able to work fine, -- the ones we were able to find, of course, there could be a book on women inventors. all the other ones we thought were significant and we didn't want to exclude women. so we made sure that we had our women's invention. the woman whose future. >> you are also very involved in education, which is a big effort to get science technology and math and engineering and the like. is this in concert without ever? >> yes, i think that is a fact that all the people that are heroes in this book, they are mathematicians and engineers and, a chem
, california. i'm sorry, first jane in new york city. >> that afternoon. i appreciate you. you raised the question of of only one woman being in the book. you did not answer that question and i would like to revisit it. my concern is that there is only one woman. there are several women inventors. why out of all african american inventors fair, white is there only one -- why is there only one -- and all only one -- and all the ones we did during black history month, okay, joy, thanks. >> the ones that we were able to work fine, -- the ones we were able to find, of course, there could be a book on women inventors. all the other ones we thought were significant and we didn't want to exclude women. so we made sure that we had our women's invention. the woman whose future. >> you are also very involved in education, which is a big effort to get science technology and math and engineering and the like. is this in concert without ever? >> yes, i think that is a fact that all the people that are heroes in this book, they are mathematicians and engineers and, a chemist and other people involv
. with commercial development going on in the city. and last year during the census of 2010 we gained of almost 550 people. which doesn't sound like a lot but with about eight or 9%, the first time augusta grew since the 1970 consensus. there's a lot of positives. we have a downtown area that is revitalizing and is growing businesses and people. young people want to live there and businesses want to locate downtown. there's a lot going for us. >> augusta, maine, was first established in 1629 and/or settled as a town in 1754. the city is not the capital of maine. booktv visited the city with the help of our partner time warner cable to explore the local lyric, and historical atmosphere. >> read a friday, i think you people because of stephen king that people who enjoy reading his books and show people that like reading about the small town try to but i think we also like nonfiction stories about their state. people similar and i think they want to read stories about states that are landlocked. i'm not sure the typical reader, if i would see anything, their people to want a good story, you know? and
kennedy there. the church bells start to chime over the city. on the plane, there are three compartments. the first compartment search the president's staff and kennedy's secretaries are sitting there sobbing. just there jacqueline kennedy is sitting next to her husband but in the center compartment lyndon johnson sitting in the president's share there is an error of great -- we know what he is planning because he is making a list on little note pads on air force one with the heading air force one and he writes on one of them one staff and leadership and has to have a meeting with staff and a meeting with the cabinet immediately and the congressional leadership. we know about incidents that occurred during the flight. in one case just before it took off. lyndon johnson calls robert kennedy. these are two men who have hated each other all their lives. at the time kennedy is having lunch. he had a house in virginia called hickory hill. there is a long green lawn that slopes down. robert kennedy is sitting at a table with robert morgan who is the u.s. attorney for new york and two things ha
innovation take our cities. so, bruce? >> so thanks, david. um, and while the panelists get ready, first of all, i just wanted to thank the sponsors here and applaud what you've done because you've done two things. one, you've taken a very broad view of technology and innovation, um, and you said it right at the beginning, david, it's not just about the next iphone, it's about connecting the dots between technology, innovation, manufacturing. the second thing you've done is you -- [inaudible] technology and innovation drives cities, and cities and metros drive national economies. it takes a long time for the united states to remember that, right? but 84% of our population live in cities and metros, and 91% of our gdp. if cities tonight perform, the nation doesn't perform. we're joined here by janet anderson who's an adjunct professor at wayne state, but most importantly works for city government, and detroit is really part of the restructuring. gordon feller from cisco's urban inknow vases -- innovations unit, michael little item john, and you've heard from carlo. and it's very hard to m
. howard first and foremost as a bowdoin upon the city to get beat, was born in maine, went on to the rank of general during the civil war, then became head of the freedman's bureau camus superintendent at west point for some time. was in charge of indian wars in the west for a wild. pundit howard university in washington d.c. as well as lincoln memorial university in tennessee and throughout his life was engaged in those institutions that he is such a large part in forming. i bowdoin commuters and the board of trustees for years and years, served as president at howard and lincoln university at different times in his life was awarded the medal of honor for service in the civil war, really had a distinct whoosh career in lots of different ways. what is pulled here are images of him overtime early on. he's a general by then, but still young. and some older ones, including an interesting woodcut rendition of had reduces hand to simple elements that provides for a grim portrait at the same time. a photograph here of him with chief joseph, who was chief of war and first tribe in the northwest,
what became this city, that is to say, the politics that produced it, and the first congress, the politics that sustained the commitment to a potomac capitol rather than a three-state capitol in the 1890s and the experience of the slaves who built washington. and in different ways these books look at the ways in which slavery distorted and corrupted american politics, and more than politics in america. and in america's great debate, particularly the years -- the decades before the civil war. now, what were the origins of this particular book? now, i kept checking the weather today because, as you probably know, storms, thunderstorms were predicted for approximately this time originally. and i was prepared for this, for thunder out there at this moment, which it isn't cooperating. because i was going to evoke the thunderous voice of daniel webster, which i won't intend to try to imitate. i'm not at open -- when i was writing my underground railroad books i came across a speech he gave to a group of businessmen in syracuse, new york, in central new york state, hot bed of underg
of washington d.c., for example, when it first came and from the city council decided to say they were going to pass a law because he was going to disrupt sort of the traditional model in terms of how taxis are regulated across the city. he suddenly saw this kind of clash between the old world and the new world in terms of disruption. at the end, they resorted a campaign an uprising by the people of the district of columbia and now it operates air. a lot of the people, the actors at the city level also has unhealthy relationships try to preserve the status quo. i think it's impossible import me when picking leaders, we elect leaders able to embrace to elegy to embrace the future rather than try to protect the status quo in the name of jobs than in the name of a lot of other areas around procurement. >> when i was last in academic, i think i should say one of the strongest defenders of the status quo is academia. since we are here at wayne state, in an academic institution, i think it would be useful to pick up on the point to look at our graduate degrees structures intersect but to me of the
in new york city and other invented journalist named benjamin created the first so-called penny press newspaper sold it for a penny a copy so going way down market trying to reach the broadest possible audience and to do that he needed to fill up with surprising and amazing things every day. fires, news from the police stations, docking of ships, anything like that that he could find her who and he wore himself out trying to fill the paper so he hired the first full-time reporter, a man named george wells near -- wilsner but i'm going to try to do something about that. >> when did journalism become a business? that is the period if you are deserting in the colonial period doesn't sound like it was -- how did it support itself? >> most of those newspapers were created by people who were really in another trade. that is they were printers and in order to keep the print shop dizzy and bring their customers into the shop to pick up their papers so that they could sell some stationary on the side or sell them a book while they were in their they hit upon the idea of the newspaper as a perf
, incumbent in 1996. look at the wonders that produced, as it did in new york city and as it has with barack obama. you can see my book in effect in last week's debate. the first objective test obama has faced. for four years he has been coddles by the media. i guess he faced a tough opponent with hillary clinton but who is she? the wife of an in peach ex-president. that is how she made her name. still she was better than john mccain. and even in the obama hillary debate the questions going to obama were so soft ball saturday night live did a sketch on it with hillary being asked these intricate complicated policy questions and the moderator asking obama if he would like another fellow. that was a fair summary and the stunning thing was not how poorly obama did was the other one. [applause] >> if john mccain had been on the stage, we would be the ones with long faces. it was how magnificent mitt romney was and the first time obama had to face a tough opponent. his whole life he has been as long as you don't make fast moves white people will love you. by his account he was smoking pot and man
development going on in this city and in the census we gained a population of 550 people which doesn't sound like a lot but was 9%. the first time augusta groove since the 1970 census. a lot of positive momentum. we have a downtown area that is revitalizing and growing business to young people who want to live down there and businesses want to locate downtown salon is going for us. >> watch booktv all weekend to see more from our recent visit to agusta, maine. for more information visited by booktv's local content vehicles go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> next on booktv education activists jonathan kozol talks about inner-city children he followed since the age of 6 to 18-year-old. he examines the economic and educational obstacles each child has face as they progress through their school system. it is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. thanks, tom and thanks as always to my absolutely favorite bookstore in america, politics and prose. i love that books for. [applause] and thanks to each and every one of you for being here. i am particularly glad to the with so many friends t
, immigrants are growing our city. for the first time since 1970 boston's population stands at over 600,000 people. for us more people means more challenged, more ideas, and more innovation. a lot of that growth, population growth has come from emigrants. one in four of estonians were born outside the united states. you know what we call immigrants here? mom and dad. you know what we call people from another country looking to fill a dream? brothers and sisters, aunts and uncles. welcome them all with open arms. here to help along the way. connect the immigrants with opportunities. resources and so much more. you're going to walk through and here 100 different languages, celebrate countless cultures, and sample food around the world . listen to the facts. in 1980 close to 70 percent of boston's was white. today less than half the city is why. that diversity is one of boston's great strengths. a real competitive advantage in today's global world. so bostons and france, a strong position that they said the start of our century. strength in our economy, growing our population, and making o
reform. last month with anti-american protesters in the streets across the cities of morocco the foreign minister travelled to washington for our first-ever strategic dialogue. he could have avoided the cameras but instead strongly condemned the attack in benghazi, embraced a broader partnership with the united states and pledged that his country would continue working towards democracy and the rule of law. algeria also has much to gain by embracing the changes taking place around it and we have seen some progress. the government held parliamentary elections in may and invited international observers to monitor them for the first time. it moved quickly last month to protect diplomatic missions including the u.s. embassy and to defuse tensions in the streets. but still algeria has a lot of work to do. up hold universal rights and create space for civil society, a message i delivered at the highest level in person in february. what do these snapshots and stories from across the region tell us? on the one hand, last month, strains of extremism that threaten those nations as well as the broa
for the first time, first time in history. but our representatives of four new york city boroughs on the supreme court. there is justice sotomayor from the bronx, justice scalia from queens, justice ginsburg from brooklyn, and justin kagan from manhattan. tragically staten island is unrepresented on the supreme court. but you never know when to might be vacancies and we might address that. there are six products of harvard law school in three parts of yale law school on the supreme court for corporately no other law schools in the united states. [laughter] besides those two. it is a bizarre and unfortunate fact i think. but those are help interesting facts about the supreme court. but, frankly, i don't think they're very important. here's an important fact about the supreme court. there are five republicans and four democrats. i will speak for somewhat longer, but this is basically all you need to know. [laughter] if there's a take away here, i've gotten to the point early. there are five republicans and four democrats, and that really tells you much of what you need to know. and it is true that
that kind of pressure of while at the same time reading back the federal? >> let me talk first about affordability proposal. what governor ryan has cities we should take the $25, $25 million in former funds that go out through title i to low income students and to ida for special needs students, former funds yes not, contrary to what jon said, cutting, and make them portable. being they would follow will -- follow out of both children to a district or charter school or enable them to enroll in a tutoring program or take courses online. this step would do three things immediately. first it would render irrelevant a host of existing regulations on use of title i funds in particular that burden school districts in various ways, constrain innovation, just make their lives more difficult, drive-up administrative costs. secondly it would put the federal government firmly behind the principle that should be used to empower student, not to our sluggish and dangers district bureaucracy. third, it would eliminate an obstacle, -- and that obstacle has been the lack of affordability through fede
-american museum and i want to welcome all of you here this evening. we are glad to hear you -- have you. first of all i was a city councilman in washington, d.c. for many years a local elected official. and when i looked at president obama's appointment to the supreme court, he has had to appointments, both women and one of them was hispanic. this is a brilliant move for a man that means that coalition to get reelected. so i wanted to just get your response. they can go back to him and if he gets reelected you all know they are going to protect. the voting rights act what is your response to that? >> no guarantee. [laughter] >> the flip side to that is the initial response you have a debt limit that gave 96% of their votes and neither one of them or by the african-american women where you complain about clarence thomas. >> and they had a high rate in any other group in the country. >> there is something to be said about ignoring that vote especially when thurgood marshall was replaced by somebody that the black community has been hands off with and that is an understatement that you have got o
at the chance, drove 14 miles in his chevy. a car, not a pickup, and there was the first faithful multiple disaster. by the end of the day the donkey had sent a hoax through the city window, blood all over the car, relieved himself on a nun, been an a little girl. [laughter] >> i have never trusted donkey's since, george wrote. they deserve to be called as ses ses. [applause] >> it wasn't until after i was majority leader that i realize the value of that statement. [laughter and applause] >> he soon created an organization that enabled him to be at the biggest vote-getter in the state, 1956. becoming the first democrat to be sent to washington from south dakota in 22 years. he immediately became a force to be reckoned with in introducing a farm bill the very first day and over the course of several months passed more legislation than any one of the 44 new members who had come in with him at the same time. his constituents were the people for whom he fought. they were south dakota families barely holding on to their family farms. they were common working people in south da
disaster as it did nric city and it has with barack obama. you can see in last week's debate, that was the first objective thing obama has. for four years he has been coddled by the media. i mean i guess he faced sort of a tough opponent with hillary and linton but who is she? she is the wife of an impeached ex-president and that is how she made her name. still, she was better than john mccain. and you know in the hillary obama debate, the questions going question's going to obama were so thoughtful saturday night live did a sketch on it with hillary being asked these incredibly intricate, complicated policy questions and then the moderator asking obama if he would like another pillow. [laughter] and that was a fair summary and the stunning thing of last week's debate was and how poorly obama did. he is as good as he ever was. [applause] if john mccain had been on the stage with him, we would be the ones -- [inaudible] that is how magnificent mitt romney was in was the first time obama had to face a tough opponent, the first time. his whole life he has been, as he says, make
for our children and grandchildren. thank you. >> let's get right to the question. the first question i have is for the congresswoman. there's a new proposal to build a stadium and complex for the buffalo bills along the city's waterfront which is presented to the council on tuesday. the teams currently at the stadium expires in 2013. you think a downtown stadium after the proposal patient as a viable alternative? hochul: i've been intrigued by the idea. i'm not sure that's going to be the right location. we have to make sure it's get the least sign. certainly when chris collins is county executive is an opportunity put this to bed and resolve the but we are come down to the 11th hour now and we have to make sure that we take care of ensuring that the buffalo bills stay here in west new york. that's priority one. secondly, will have to step up and help them. the stadium is becoming obsolete. we need to make sure that they got the best resources here in this community because our identity is linked to the buffalo bills. even when they have the ups and downs, i feel very confident that it
that from the book in many ways. >> augusta, maine, was first established by english others in 1629. they were settled as a town in 1754. the city is now the capital of maine. booktv visited the city with the help of our partner, time warner, to explore the historical and literary atmosphere. >> i think people like to read a variety. beaucoup enjoyed reading stephen king's books. and you have people that like reading about small-town maine. readers also like nonfiction stories about people similar to them. you know, they want to read stories about states that are landlocked. so i'm not sure they are typical readers, but i think my same thing, there are people who want a good story. you know? and not a pretentious story. i think you often see people who may be wealthy, but they all wear flannel shirts and they don't show off their wealth. they want people who are true people want stories about simple people who go about their lives. they take from what they know. writers in maine take from what they know. they write about what mars and families and historical things that have happene
it dracula he would agreed the tale of two cities. we both kept our promise and i think he got the better part of the bargain. [laughter] at 13 he handed in his first novel he failed every test he took because he hated the 80 of the test and would not participate with the drilling some of the schools spend half the year how to outwit the test. nothing to do with learning. he went to school in england and ninth grade principal said this boy will never go college. he is not college material. he cannot pass his test. of wonderful headmaster said there is something and this boy. we will not give up on him. he had 12 for 14 kids in his class. he graduated from a wonderful college a few years ago also back in the south bronx serving with the kids he left behind. he wants to be a minister. episcopal priest. he will give a guest sermon this sunday. the things about that boy that were so wonderful, they will never show up in numbers. i don't think thoreau would have done well on the standardized exams. he would purposely picked the wrong answers because he was so stubborn. at least emerson said he
the cities of morocco, the foreign minister travel to washington for our first-ever strategic dialogue. he could have avoided the cameras but instead he strongly condemned the attack and benghazi and embraced a broader partnership with the united states, and pledged that the country would continue working toward democracy and the rule of law. algeria also has much to gain by embracing the changes that are taking place around it, and we have seen some progress. the government held parliamentary elections in may invited international observers to monitor them for the first time and it moved quickly last month. a protected diplomatic commissions including u.s. embassy in to defuse tensions in the streets but still algeria has a lot of work to do to uphold universal rights and create a civil society. a message i delivered at the highest level in person in february. what do these snapshots and stories from across the region tell us? on the one hand, last month's violence revealed strains of extremism that threaten those nations as well as the broader region and even the united states. on the ot
. they don't allow the local cities and counties to add a mosquito abatement tax, or having a always tax holiday where you don't pay any sales tax on the first $50 of school supplies during certain days. rules like that make collection of sales tax across the country insanely complex. so pennsylvania is trying be simple. they exempt digital download and they're not members of the streamline sales tax because they want to maintain what they call a business friendly environment. >> i think this highlights the balance i talked about earlier that congress has to strike between the burdens and state sovereignty on the other. many of those things that make the sales tax more complex are things that consumers and voters like. sales tax holidays, caps and thresholds so you're not paying sales tax on a full price. those are things that consumers and voters like so it's a balance on one hand between those desires of the voters the states and the desire fireness and also for the states to be able to maintain their taxes in a way that makes sense so that to the extent the taxes being imposed, it's a
's never been a tax cut in the history of the new york city government. this is the first time it happened. [laughter] every single mayor in the past, including republicans, raised taxes. well, i did it then for eight years. ultimately, we got some really big tax cuts, and ended up being $3 billion to $4 billion in tax cuts, and we collected more revenues from the lower taxes than the higher taxes because that energized the economy. it took money out of the wasted pocket of the city and put it in the hands of people who actually spend money in a productive and sensible way that produces jobs. it was not the only thing that turned around the economy of new york city, but here's the difference. started with 10.5%. i left with 5.5% unemployment. i started with 5.1 million on welfare and left with 500,000 left on welfare. the population was 7 million when i started, and i left with 8.1 million people. a lot of that had to do with the fact we energized a private sector. that's the difference of what's going to happen with taxes, depending on the choice the american people make on november 6th.
] yeah, no protestants for the first time in history. there are representatives of four new york city boar roes on -- boroughs on the supreme court. there is justice sotomayor from the bronx, justice scalia from queens, justice ginsburg from brooklyn and justice kagan from manhattan. tragically, staten island is unrepresented on the supreme court, but you never know when there might be vacancies, and we might address that gap. [laughter] there are six products of harvard law school and three products of yale law school on the supreme court. there are apparently no other law schools in the united states. [laughter] besides those two. no, it is a bizarre and unfortunately fact, i think. but those are, i hope, interesting facts about the supreme court. but frankly, i don't think they're very important. here's an important fact. about the supreme court. there are five republicans and four democrats. i will speak for somewhat longer, but this is basically all you need to know. [laughter] if be there's a takeaway here, i have gotten to the point early. there are five republicans and four de
, the best thing for the screen, in 1963. tired of his house in your city he moved. they are vidal finishes bet not -- best novel today. the last pagan emperor, is a subject that is the subject of for fastening chapters. expanding on the first person examples, and memoirs, vidal told the tale through multiple and a raiders, a device that enabled him to use pieces of a voice he developed in his essays. he was better at showing -- that are at telling and showing anyway. and first person narrative is all telling. storytelling. the book came out in 1964 with excellent reviews. it was a surprise bestseller. he returned to edgewater, wrote more essays, more political journalism and it worked in other screenplays before he returned to rome to finish his washington novel. this is simply named washington, d.c. is a family saga about political life from the new deal to the mccarthy era. at bush in early 1957, it was a step backwards, a surprisingly clunky novel written mostly in expository dialogue. there's a promising subplot in the homoerotic bond between a newspaper publisher, a young politician,
was the chief of the urban populist movement in chicago where it was first tested to see if he could couple the interest of the dirt farmers with the immigrants and the factory workers in the city. and so he ran for congress once and was defeated. he was offered the nomination for mayor of chicago and turned it down and was offered the nomination for governor of illinois entered the town. in 1904 when william randolph hearst ran for president, darrow tried to do what william jennings bryan had done, which is seize the presidential nomination with a single speech. he was supposed to nominate first for the presidency. he wrote this amazing speech. he gave it as -- at midnight one night at the democratic national convention. all the reporters just loved it. it did move the gallery bill wait -- it did not move the gallery the way that bryant had, the magic just was not there. the goal democrats, the wall street democrats to come back and seize the party and controlled the floor. so it was a trick that darrow tried. he could not pull it off. it was one of the reasons why he hated bryan ellis lif
city history. there's never been a tack cut in the history of new york city government. it's the first time it happened. every single mayor in the past including republicans raised taxes. i did for eight years and ultimately we got big tax cuts ending up being $3 or $4 billion in tax cuts. we were collecting more revenue from the lowest taxes than highest taxes it energized the economy. it took money out of the wasted pocket of the city, and put it in the hands of people who actually spend money in a productive and sensible way that produces jobs. it wasn't the only thing that turned around the economy of new york city, here's the difference, started with $10.5 percent. i left with 5.5 unemployment. i started started start 1.1 million people on welfare. i left with 500,000 people on welfare. i started with a city that had a population of 7.5 million and left with 8.1 million people population. a lot had to do with the fact we energized the private sector. that's the difference of what's going to happen with taxes depending on the choice the american people make on november 6th we're go
earlier i reintroduced the first tax rollback in the history of the city. i worked with democrats and republicans to pass it we gave property tax relief to senior citizens and working families. when i was in the state legislature of in a bipartisan fashion and i served on the house entrance committee where we reconstructed the oversight to the workers investment fund to protect your hard-earned dollars. i worked in a bipartisan way to pass a balanced budget. i worked in a bipartisan way to keep young people here in the state of ohio. i identified an issue the export of kids and grandkids from a high of. i worked in a bipartisan way to management in the state of ohio were referring to the highest rating bonds and investment and voluntarily cut our budget two years in a row. >> senator you have 30 seconds. brown: i would emphasize again josh mandel in the home party and the speaker of the hostile legislature talks a good game but with a 96% of the time and the only time he does in the financial skirred doesn't have a better offer and when he voted against satisfying to pay lenders w
similar but truman began his career working at a bank, working in kansas city. his roommate for the first year was arthur eisenhower, eisenhower's oldest brother. they live together in the same room. the same rooming house. been back there is a document that is in the war papers and i don't know how many historians have seen this one but it was a message in effect being relayed to eisenhower through his older brother from harry truman who was then a senator in missouri and had not been elevated to the vice presidency yet and had and it was about 1943 emma before the political year began. this is from the u.s. senator of missouri to be commander of the european forces, the supreme allied institution of forces. you are the inevitable successor of franklin roosevelt and as it turns out harry truman finds himself in a role like andrew johnson after the american civil for somebody who has been dropped into this natural succession. >> unfortunately we could probably go for another hour and we'll have 150 questions. we have one minute left. you get 15 seconds of it and we will give our panel is
of what was his first election. we continue to get materials from his office in the law firm in new york city, and it's still getting awards and generating material for his career and so they come to rest over time. in 1990 having just been elected the senate majority leader, mitchell was involved in the 1990 amendments to the act and this is a letter from george h. w. bush thanking him for his collaboration and succeeding in getting that legislation passed. the 1990 amendment was important for us today. we paid $4 a gallon for gas in the sense that it was the amendment that discussed the composition of gas and the introduction of chemicals during certain seasons of the year in order to make for cleaner air. in a sample of his writing style. there are researchers to come because they're interested in particular topics but there's also people that come because the interested in particular techniques or approaches. some people are interested in the newspapers because of the negotiation for instance. and so this is a research question that bridges a variety of the records that we have and o
keep records of how people have adding averages today. this city will be celebrating in a sense its first return to major league baseball finals in washington, and get every morning you can read how players are doing. this morning is already telling have a stock market is doing. within 10 minutes of its opening we have ability to judge how its numbers compared to yesterday and a week ago, a month ago. there are any number of examples how we keep records of how we are doing. are we doing better or are we doing worse? yet we have failed over the years to keep the same kind of calibration about how we're doing over the most important constituency all of us acknowledge and admit, and that is our children. how are they doing in our country, and howard are they doing compared to others around the world, and that we doing a better job? are we celebrating in of the victories that have been made over the years and improving the quality of life of children? if not why aren't we doing better in certain areas? this is an idea that's been a long time coming to have that once a year, to build a g
in the city where i was visiting mark. it was quite a violent incident according to the early reports and by then it was an hour to after we had heard the first sirens. there were choppers flying around and six or seven different police agencies were converging with the huge and rapidly escalating manhunt. mark turned to me and said this sounds like your kind of story. he was sort of half joking but when joshua trees are involved i'm usually right there. even though i do break for sand and the desert is often the main character i don't respond to every siren i hear and i don't do that kind of reporting even though the story "desert reckoning" and ironically enough. i guess i have with this book. which took eight years by the way. at any rate we started watching the coverage as it unfolded that afternoon and it turned out that the two main characters involved were very compelling to me. there was a dedicated hermit donald cook who was a suspect in the shooting and he had fled after ambushing the sheriff and it turned out that he was a doctor too little figure with an assault rifle and
-election although it was really his first election. we continue to get materials from senator mitchell's office. he now has a law firm in new york city and is still getting awards and generating material through his career. so these things come to us over time. in 1990, having just been elected to the senate majority leader mitchell was involved in 1990 in the clean air act in this was a letter from george h. w. bush thanking him for his collaboration and succeeding in getting that legislation passed. the 1990 amendment was important for us today. we pay $4 a gallon for gas. it was the amendment that discussed the composition of gas and the introduction of chemicals during certain seasons of the year in order to make cleaner air. and then a sample of mitchell's writing style. there are their researchers to come because they are interested in particular topics but there are also people who come because they are interested in particular techniques or purchase. some people are interested in mitchell's papers because of his negotiating skills for instance and so this is a research question that bridges
the sentimental power of this novel that lasts very much to the present day. >> it augusta maine was first established by english settlers from the plymouth colony in 1629 and was settled as a town in 1754. the city is now the capitol of maine. booktv as it did the city with the help of our partner time warner cable to explore the local literary and historical atmosphere. >> people in maine like to read a friday and i think because of people like steven king people who enjoy reading his books, and you have people that like reading about small-town maine but i think maine likes fiction, stories about their state and i think you know they want to read stories about states that are landlocked. i think if i would say anything, there are people who want a good story. you often see people in maine that may be wealthy but they were where flannel shirts and they don't show off their wealth. i think people, if i could say anything about the stories, they want people that are true, not flashy or surely so i can see them relating to this story about a simple people who go about their lives. i think t
case against the city's mayor and some co-conspirators in a bribery scandal. he took over the case, he was second chair of the case at the outset but took over the first chair when the lead prosecutor was shot in the head in court by a dismissed juror. law students, take note. [laughter] it -- johnson made his name in that case and went on to serve as governor of california and to spearhead a singular political movement in the state's history which was the rise of the california progressives. the progressives were, by today's definitions, a bit of a hybrid, and they are sometimes also misunderstood. they were importantly not populist. it was not a pop list movement per se. they were largely middle class men, many were -- many ran small businesses. their principal target of their reform efforts was the southern pacific whose political influence they deplored and which kept them -- which shut them out of business. they loathed corruption and vice, they were quite bourgeois and moderate in their ideological politics. they managed to sort of simultaneously deplore two kind of icons of soci
-american protesters across the cities of morocco, the foreign minister travel to washington for our first ever strategic dialogue. he could have avoided the cameras but instead strongly condemned the attack and benghzi embrace the broader partnership with united states and pledged his country would work toward democracy and the rule flop. -- rule of law. algeria also has much to gain by embracing the challenges that taking place around it. the government held elections in may and invited international observers to monitor them. it moved quickly. with diplomatic missions including the u.s. embassy to diffuse tension in the street. algeria has a lot of work to do to up old universal rights in create space for civil society a message of the burden person in february. on the one hand strains of extremism the renovations as well as the broader region and the misstates we have seen actions that would be hard to imagine a few years ago. elected leaders and free people in arab countries standing up for a peaceful pluralist future. it is too soon to say how the transitions will play out. but not in dou
, such as in pyongyang which is a closed city, our recent information. and also those along the border with china. so i would say bombard the place with as much information as possible. and your first question, which is i think the key one, and i imagine joseph engaging and jay will have some comment on this as well. i see no evidence that kim jong-un is prepared to change north korea. his actions about his issue to kill orders, suggest to me is as determined as he dashed to his father and grandfather were to keep the north korean people under his. you know, there have been recent reports that he has a bride, that there was a picture of him with mickey mouse. i think that's all public relations. and the transport historically, especially kim jong-il, have been very good at public relations. speaking to the international media. i doubt that this place at all in north korea. even if north koreans know that kim jong-un has a wife can i do think it would make any difference to them. >> as far as the changes going on, i think i would agree with melanie that they're by and large cosmetic changes. i think the
. first, republican candidate ovide lamontagne, a business attorney and was the republican nominee for governor back in 1996. ovide and his wife, betty, reside with their three children in the city of manchester. and the democrat, maggie hassan, maggie is an attorney and the former new hampshire senate majority leader. maggie ander husband tom live in exeter, they have two children. welcome all. now, let's get started. our first question comes from kevin of the telegraph. >> thank you, charlie, and good evening to you both. this is for mr. lamontagne. the new hampshire center for public policy studies released a report that saying new hampshire advantage, that mixture of low taxes and highly-educated residents that has powered the state's economy for decades is slipping away. what can be done to solve the problem? lamontagne: thank you, kevin, and thank you aarp new hampshire and wbin for sponsoring this debate this evening. it's an opportunity the for us to discuss and have a conversation with the voters of new hampshire about the future of our great state. we are seeing an erosio
the cities of morocco, the foreign minister traveled to washington for our first ever strategic dialogue. it could have avoided the cameras, instead he strongly condemned the attack on bonn benghazi and pledged his continue would continue working toward democracy and the rule of law. al jeer are a has much to gain by embracing the changes that are taking place around it. we have seen some progress. to protect diplomatic missions including the u.s. embassy and diffuse tension in the street. but still algeria has a lot of work to do to uphold universal rights and create space for civil society. amessage i delivered at the highest level in person in february. what do the snapshots and stories from across the region foal us? on the one hand, last month violence revealed strains of extremism that threaten the nation wells the broader region and even the united states. on the other hand, we have seen actions that would have been hard to imagine a few years ago. democratically elected leaders and free people in arab countries standing up for a peaceful plurrist future. it is way too soon to say
consumers in north carolina. dalton: the first thing you do is make sure cities are not taking that money and subsidizing their general funds, told tax rates down so they look good to the people but killing the people on the municipal service so if you do that you will see the debt come down but the other way is to look at my economic development plan because it has a provision from capital funding for manufacturing. the mayor was talking about manufacturing in the 20th century, i am all for that. my plan has a provision for that and will put people back to work in manufacturing and we need to give an incentive for the manufacturing facilities to come back into our cities and when you get that large load you are going to get more revenue. that is part of the problem. a lot of these have shutdown. a lot of furniture mills have shut down and lost those revenues. if you go to federal trade policies in 2003-2004 we had 17% unemployment. i know the pain of that and those trade policies send jobs overseas and closed manufacturing facilities. if we get those back those revenues will come in and
the teacher unions, the city and state, on lobbying in the state. that was the first time that ever happened. i don't think it'll probably ever happen again and, you know, going back 25 years this is one year in a blip. there is money going into advocacy around education reform. i think those of us who are doing it would love to see, um, the amount sort of match what people perceive are out there. i think finish. >> that's a fundraising plea? >> well, it's actually more of a dynamic sort of conspiracies about how much money is flying around. actually, in all honesty, makes us seem like we're more connected to money than we actually are. diane ravitch tweets about, you know, financial aspects of what things that i'm working on, it always ends up making me more relevant than i was before she did it. it's sort of, um, because it takes a while, um, for the official filings that you file to show how much you spent. and when people are claiming you're spending more than you are, you're sort of given more credit than you actually have earned at the time. but it's a, look, there's -- i think on the
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